Earthquake Response Program

July 6th, 2015 | admin

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While SETU Nepal realized that the support from government and non government organization has been more focused on the most heavily affected districts we became concern on districts such as Lalitpur and Bhaktpur within a closer proximity to Kathmandu. During survey and study on southern Lalitpur, SETU Nepal found that 90% of houses have been damaged, a vast number of domesticated animals and livestock have been killed and public buildings have been seriously damaged. Women and children are vulnerable to trafficking in this difficult time. The government has handed down legislation that states no one can transfer women and children without government permissions, indicating a high risk of trafficking and abuse. 5 village development communities in south Lalitpur have noted the vulnerable status of teenage girls in communal temporary housing. Increased awareness is needed regarding violence, trafficking and income generating activities to reduce risk.

Majority of the schools are sorely damaged in Lalitpur district, which affects the future of an entire generation in terms of education. We propose to help all children so that no one is forced to drop out their education By offering practical support in terms of academia and nutrition, we can provide sustainable support for the community.

Addressing to above situation, we on behalf of SETU Nepal visited the rural area of the district of Lalitpur to analyze institutional centers (mainly schools) and monitor children and women after earthquake.

From visits to seven government school of four village development communities (“VDCs”), we made several observations. While Lalitpur is situated near Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, over 80% of the region is mountainous and difficult to reach. There are quite a few fundamental differences between the schooling systems: as they are further from the capital, they are further removed from government influence.

Every school must provide early childhood development centers (ECD centers), but in practice, the facilities were not adequate. Those Community people of lower incomes have suffered from a lack in food and shelter provisions in the wake of the earthquake. In Lalitpur, 90% of houses have cracked foundations and are partially collapsed, deemed unsafe to live in by engineers. Makeshift communities have formed, with people cooking in the same house and pitching tents in clusters. Here, the motivation for children to go to school is at an all time low.

The majority of schools have received financial backing to build temporary learning centers. This support is insufficient: two grades often share one room, which do not always pass the minimum health and safety requirements. They lack teaching materials, uniforms, first aid kits, even flooring in the rooms; there is no nutritional provision, gendered bathrooms or library materials. With classes limited to 1 teacher to 45 children, or 1 for 30 for early childcare development, the district is suffering.

Collapsed houses

Collapsed houses

Child and livestock near collapsed house

Child and livestock near collapsed house

children ready to enter into the classroom of tent

children ready to enter into the classroom of tent